Bendigo Orienteering Fixture for 2020

The 2020 season fixture has been finalised; several members have already volunteered to organise and help run some of these events. We are relying on members to look at the fixture (it can be viewed in the Events Tab), decide which event they will organise or help with and send Julie Flynn an email at julieflynn@fastmail.fm so your name can be added to the document. The club relies on members to volunteer and organise our events.

There is a change to the collection of controls policy for 2020. No longer are people expected to collect controls at the previous event. Organisers will put out and arrange for their controls to be collected, so they do not have to attend events on 2 consecutive weeks. This has been adopted because the trailer is used regularly and members can access this at the Bendigo Woollen Mills site at 4 Lansell Street.

The club finished our very successful 2019 season with a short sprint event inside the Victoria Hill Diggings reserve and a barbeque in the adjacent park. Trophies and medallions were awarded to those people who finished the season in 1st, 2nd and 3rd place in each of our categories.

The Noodle award was decided by popular vote and the winner was Peter Forbes, for his performance at Mt Kooyoora.

The Golden Leg award for the best course setting was also decided from the members’ vote, and this was awarded to Clare Brownridge, for her courses on Sedgwick.

This year there were no officially nominated members for the Black Crow, despite many great efforts at stuffing up.

On Friday 6 December, the Regional Primary Schools Orienteering Championships event was held at Hanging Rock. Two of our members, Hugo and Josh each won 1st places in their classes, and two schools we have supported this year placed in the Loddon Mallee schools category: Maldon Primary School won 1 st place and Eppalock Primary School won 3rd place.

The club is planning for and looking forward to March 2020, when the Coach in Residence, Frederic Tranchand will be spending 2 weeks in Bendigo to provide training for members and working in local schools to bring the joys of orienteering to children and their families.

Julie Flynn

Ian’s 91st birthday event

This sprint O event was held in very cold weather conditions at Black Jack Gully near Castlemaine. The courses were set by Ian Johnson, our club’s oldest member, and organised by Colin Walker and John Wilkinson. The area contains old gold mining features with erosion gullies and relatively flat bushland. It is suited to a sprint style event.

Competitors had three courses to choose from: hard (3-4 km), moderate (2.5 km) and easy (1.5-2 km). A small field completed the courses with only one or two showers dampening conditions. Everyone enjoyed the event as well as the variety of cakes to celebrate Ian’s 91st birthday. Ian was on hand to offer advice (thanks to Derek Morris for bringing him from Melton). It was great to see him looking so well. He appreciated the opportunity to visit controls, having a break in between. Thanks to Lorraine, Alison, Sue and Jenny who brought sweet treats. Thanks also to those who helped collect the controls at the end.

A really good social day.

John Wilkinson
Jenny Ball

RESULTS

Bendigo Bush Short 1 – Prince of Wales – 6 April 2019

The club season has begun with the first of 3 bush short events, where we have just 3 courses on offer in smaller sections of Bendigo’s bushland. This series of events started many years ago as an opportunity for people who are new to the sport to have a go. Back then we offered only an easy and moderate course, but over the years, experienced orienteers have wanted a harder course in addition to the others.

It was a warm autumn day, and 36 people participated. This map has many tracks, so most people found themselves navigating the track system in the very dry forest. Some names aren’t listed because they were part of a group. Unfortunately the IT complexities were too hard for the organiser on the day so we the results were not uploaded onto the Eventor website. The results are presented here, in a more manual format:

Julie

C course: 1.9km
1 Tim Turnbull 00:18:03
2 Jack Barianos 00:25:51
3 Sue Davidson 00:34:11
4 Akira Hill 00:50:21

 

B course: 2.4km
1 Tony Bird 00:21:00
2 Nigel McGuckian 00:22:00
3 Peter Searle 00:22:20
4 Peter Hill 00:22:25
5 Alison Radford 00:24:05
6 Paul Elam 00:25:39
7 Sheila Colls 00:26:46
8 Tim Turnbull 00:28:25
9 Louise Hall 00:28:26
10 Jenny Ball 00:29:26
11 Anne Garvie 00:30:29
12 Lorraine Leversha 00:30:36
13 Xavier Ough 00:36:23
14 Charlotte Ough 00:40:26
15 Ross and Leon Slater 00:40:58
16 Dick and Margaret Barker 00:44:02
17 Prue Dobbin dnf

 

A Course: 5.6km
1 Ben Goonan 00:33:18
2 David Brownridge 00:38:08
3 Shayne Hill 00:35:55
4 Jim Russell 00:38:28
5 Ilka Barr 00:45:46
6 Neil Barr 00:46:10
7 Andrew Cameron 00:46:36
8 Andrew Wallace 00:59:17
9 Tony Radford 01:05:48
10 Terry Davidson 01:28:05

Bendigo Orienteers would like to acknowledge and pay respects to the traditional owners, the Dja Dja Wurrung people, whose country we are on and extend our respect to their Elders, both past and present.

Longlea this Weekend

Despite the exodus of Bendigo orienteers to Bathurst for the Australian Championships over the next two weekends, it is business as usual in Bendigo with an event at Longlea, a 15 minute drive east via Strathfieldsaye towards Eppalock. In response to a call for a course setter, Mark Hennessy volunteered to course set at short notice. I went out on Tuesday and tagged some of his sites, and was pleased to email Mark as follows: “I think your courses are pretty good; they will be both challenging & enjoyable”.

Mark tells us the theme is “gentle relief” after the rigours of the Creswick gold diggings last weekend. The terrain is gently undulating, but with enough bends in the few contours to help you navigate. The ground is generally soft, without much rock underfoot. The bush is generally open and easy to move through, with some wattle blooms fading and others still bright yellow. There are no steep hills or erosion gullies (there is one, a metre deep, but no one has to cross it).

Mark has been offered assistance from Andrew Wallace, David Jones and Nigel McGuckian. Thanks to all. Look for O-signs to the right, immediately after Gleesons Road. Start time as usual is 12.30 to 2 pm, with courses closing at 3 pm. Offers to collect controls will be welcome.

STATE SERIES 6 – Lockwood Ranges – Sunday 6th August 2017

Eventor entries close at midnight Thursday 3rd August.
Enter on the day is available, subject to map availability.

Assembly area: At the corner of Mohair Rd and Jacko Track, Lockwood.

Start between 10 am and 1 pm. All courses close at 3 pm.

Nine courses available, from 15.5 km to 2.0 km.

Lockwood Ranges is a newly mapped area on the south-west side of Bendigo. The south of the map is steep spur gully, and the north very gentle terrain, in parts almost flat with a Mallee-like forest. In the flatter areas controls are generally placed on scattered surface mining features, watercourses and clearings. Accurate compass work will be required. The longer courses head into the steeper hill country where orienteers will face a 2.5 km route choice leg.

For further details go to https://eventor.orienteering.asn.au/Events/Show/4770

Andrew Wallace

Event Report – Korong Spur, July 1, 2017

It’s always a challenge to set orienteering courses in granite terrain and for this reason I teamed up with Darren Eenjes (or should I say the entire Eenjes family) to run our Korong Spur event. We also had the good fortune to have the permission of Ian Fraser (the owner of the property that adjoins our start location) to use his driveway for parking. This made it easier for us to get Parks Victoria approval for our event. It was a pleasure dealing with Ian, who is an avid environmentalist and a fan of our sport.

After running a successful event on this map in 2016 with Darren as course-setter I was keen to follow up with another set of memorable courses. I made an early decision to include a strong route-choice leg on Course 1 and this was well received by runners, who chose to attack the leg in various ways. The most popular route chosen was via the track to the West. Courses 2 and 3 were truncated versions of Course 1. Course 4 was a ‘hard’ moderate course, made easier by having all control sites in relatively close proximity to the Eastern perimeter road. As was the case in our 2016 Korong Spur event it was necessary to provide taped routes for more difficult legs on Course 5. For all courses my aim was to provide opportunities for orienteers to move quickly through mostly open terrain, with fair control sites and inspiring views. The moderately ‘friendly’ granite terrain on Korong Spur made my task relatively easy.

A couple of trips to Mt Korong were necessary to tape control sites and most controls were placed two days prior to the event. After an extremely cold beginning July 1 cleared to become a lovely sunny winter’s day. 49 runners started on the day with only 5 non-finishers. On Course 1 Matthew Schepisi made a return to local orienteering and won with an impressive rate of just over 7 minutes per kilometre. Ben and Richard Goonan were close behind him. Jimmy Cameron was a clear winner on Course 2, with other creditable performances from Michael Loughnan, Andrew Cameron and Tavish Eenjes. John ‘Wilko’ Wilkinson’s nagging injuries didn’t stop him winning Course 3, but Serryn Eenjes finished an impressive second despite a couple of navigational errors.

Winners in the moderate and easy courses were Ryan Davies (DROC) in Course 4 and Xavier Ough on Course 5.

Post-race discussion centred around route choices on Course 1 and the difficulties experienced by many competitors in finding the first control (common to courses 1 to 4). When choosing this control site (located only 150 metres from the start triangle and accurately placed) the course-setter believed it was possibly too obvious. Obviously not.

Daryl Fleay


click to download as PDF

Bendigo Orienteers battle the wheel cactus

On the 18th June, Bendigo Orienteers held its first wheel cactus eradication day at Mt Kooyoora. The wheel cactus plants growing on the northern side of Mt Kooyoora were first noticed by Julie Flynn and Neil Barr when they were setting their Bermuda Triangle event early in May. Wheel cactus is a noxious weed that spreads very easily and is covered with very sharp spines. The proposal to tackle the wheel cactus plants at Mt Kooyoora was raised at the committee meeting and the eradication day was subsequently organised.

Nine orienteers meet up with members from the Friends of Kooyoora, and Loddon Plains Landcare Network Facilitator James Nelsson and his wife Trudy. James supplied all the equipment including stabbers for injecting the wheel cactus plants with herbicide, hoes for pulling up the young plants, and gloves. Before setting off to the mountain everyone was required to don a high visibility vest, which was quite a novelty for the orienteers. The team armed themselves with hoes, stabbers, and pink spray paint for marking the plants that had been stabbed. James demonstrated how to administer the herbicide and pull out the younger wheel cactus plants.

After a hike to Mt Kooyoora the team ascended the steep slope and began to attack the wheel cactus. Many large patches of the plant were discovered. James was very impressed by the fitness and enthusiasm of the orienteers. After a few hours of work everyone decided to head back for lunch. From a high point about a hundred metres away from the mountain we were able to survey the huge number of wheel cactus plants that had been sprayed with pink paint. We were all quietly pleased with our efforts.

After a pleasant lunch we all vowed to be back in 2018, as the battle against wheel cactus is one that requires persistence and team work. We also hope that other members of the orienteering community will join the fight.

A big thanks to volunteers and supporters Daryl Fleay, Neil Barr, David and Heather Jones, Nigel and Deb McGuckian, Tony and Alison Radford and Julie Flynn.

Andrew Wallace

Wheel Cactus Eradication Day at Mt Kooyoora

Sunday 18 June from 9.45am

The Wheel Cactus is considered a Weed of National Significance in Australia as it spreads rapidly and is difficult to destroy. The plants produce fruit containing numerous seeds. Birds and foxes consume the fruit, then spread the seeds far and wide. Wheel cactus grows particularly well in shallow granite soils. The plants are covered with fine sharp spines, up to 5 cm long, that can easily pierce a person’s skin.

Wheel cactus plants have been spreading in the northern part of the Kooyoora State Park. If this is allowed to continue it will make this area much less favourable for orienteering events. Furthermore, the natural beauty of this area will be significantly degraded.

We are seeking volunteers to poison or pull out the wheel cactus plants. This activity is being conducted in cooperation with Parks Victoria, Friends of Kooyoora and the Loddon Plains Landcare Network. Volunteers will receive equipment, training and supervision.

If you are interested in being involved please contact Julie Flynn on 0429 496 422 or email julie_flynn@fastmail.fm

Directions:
Take the Calder Hwy through Inglewood and continue 7km to Kurting. Turn left onto the Brenanah-Kurting Rd (just past the abandoned Kurting Hall). Follow for 9.7km to a T junction. Turn left onto the Kingower-Wedderburn Rd and travel 1.5km to the assembly area. Please park on the edge of the road, not in the bush.